In Copenhagen the waste-to-energy plant becomes a ski slope

Designed by the Bjarke Ingels Group, the Amager Bakke – Copenhill waste-to-energy plant is preparing to become the new cult destination for sportsmen, including a climbing and climbing wall

Building a waste-to-energy plant in the middle of a green area entirely dedicated to sport and wellness may seem like a contradiction. But not if you are in Denmark, and if behind the entire project is the signature of the prestigious architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group. The Amager Bakke – Copenhill complex should be inaugurated in the autumn of next year: a 750 million euro facility in the immediate vicinity of Copenhagen, which in addition to burning waste and producing energy for neighboring cities will also host on its surface a ski slope and a climbing wall.

The project, the result of a 2010 call, aims to turn Copenhagen into the world’s first zero-emission capital. The waste-to-energy plant has been designed to receive around 400 thousand tonnes of waste every year, and to transform it into electricity and hot water with which to heat homes and offices. All strictly zero-impact: the smoke that escapes from the chimneys of the structure is actually a harmless water vapor, while the waste-to-energy residues are reused as fertilizer for agriculture and building material.

But that is not all. Because in addition to show off a very respectable design, made of glass, aluminum and steel, Amager Bakke – Copenhill is preparing to become a mandatory destination for the most avid sportsmen. Thanks to its considerable size, 200 meters long, 60 wide and 90 high, this artificial hill will soon be equipped with all the necessary equipment to convert to the ski slope, complete with a ski lift, safety barriers and snow cannons fed by the same power plant.

While on the side wall will be set up an artificial climbing wall of 86 meters.

“The goal is to connect Amager Bakke – Copenhill to the center of Copenhagen and make this complex a real reference point for lovers of skiing and climbing, practically active for the entire duration of the year”, explain the managers of the Amager Ressource Center. “The project developed by Bjarke Ingels is not only beautiful from an aesthetic point of view, but also absolutely functional. A café will also be built inside the building, and visitors will enjoy the breathtaking view of the city “. The system, it seems, can serve up to a maximum of 200 skiers at a time, while the price per hour of ski passes should be around 70 crowns, about 9.50 euros.